Let's start over again
strawberryrain:

mothernaturenetwork:

What the universe has in common with ‘Doctor Who’The universe may be bigger on the inside, like the Doctor’s TARDIS.

HEY BT

strawberryrain:

mothernaturenetwork:

What the universe has in common with ‘Doctor Who’
The universe may be bigger on the inside, like the Doctor’s TARDIS.

HEY BT

geekhideout:

Maybe! ;)


Definitely read “Aleve” like it has a headache and needs medicine.

geekhideout:

Maybe! ;)

Definitely read “Aleve” like it has a headache and needs medicine.

zettymachete:

The epitome of “physics sandbox.”

This is one of my favorite video game videos ever.

the-star-stuff:

Fiber Optics

The sheer ubiquity of fiber optics in our communications infrastructure, along with its presence tucked away in the background, has most certainly led to its status as an underrated technology. Though initially developed in the late 19th century, it wasn’t until the 1970s that long distance attenuation could be achieved. These cables, which transmit information using bursts of light, have made them superior to conventional cables in a host of ways, including immunity to electromagnetic interference, data security, non-conductivity, no spark hazards, ease of installation, and of course, high bandwidth over long distances — including 100 terabits per second in some cases. It largely allowed the internet revolution to happen.

laboratoryequipment:

Invisibility Cloak Works for Particles TooA new approach that allows objects to become “invisible” has now been applied to an entirely different area: letting particles “hide” from passing electrons, which could lead to more efficient thermoelectric devices and new kinds of electronics.Normally, electrons travel through a material in a way that is similar to the motion of electromagnetic waves, including light; their behavior can be described by wave equations. That led the MIT researchers to the idea of harnessing the cloaking mechanisms developed to shield objects from view — but applying it to the movement of electrons, which is key to electronic and thermoelectric devices.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/invisibility-cloak-works-particles-too

laboratoryequipment:

Invisibility Cloak Works for Particles Too

A new approach that allows objects to become “invisible” has now been applied to an entirely different area: letting particles “hide” from passing electrons, which could lead to more efficient thermoelectric devices and new kinds of electronics.

Normally, electrons travel through a material in a way that is similar to the motion of electromagnetic waves, including light; their behavior can be described by wave equations. That led the MIT researchers to the idea of harnessing the cloaking mechanisms developed to shield objects from view — but applying it to the movement of electrons, which is key to electronic and thermoelectric devices.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/invisibility-cloak-works-particles-too

quantumaniac:

Hubble Watches Star Clusters On a Collision Course

Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy to our Milky Way.

What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus (also known as the Tarantula Nebula) has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years.

The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters.

Lead scientist Elena Sabbi of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., and her team began looking at the area while searching for runaway stars, fast-moving stars that have been kicked out of their stellar nurseries where they first formed. “Stars are supposed to form in clusters, but there are many young stars outside 30 Doradus that could not have formed where they are; they may have been ejected at very high velocity from 30 Doradus itself,” Sabbi said.

She then noticed something unusual about the cluster when looking at the distribution of the low-mass stars detected by Hubble. It is not spherical, as was expected, but has features somewhat similar to the shape of two merging galaxies where their shapes are elongated by the tidal pull of gravity. Hubble’s circumstantial evidence for the impending merger comes from seeing an elongated structure in one of the clusters, and from measuring a different age between the two clusters.

According to some models, the giant gas clouds out of which star clusters form may fragment into smaller pieces. Once these small pieces precipitate stars, they might then interact and merge to become a bigger system. This interaction is what Sabbi and her team think they are observing in 30 Doradus.

Also, there are an unusually large number of high-velocity stars around 30 Doradus. Astronomers believe that these stars, often called “runaway stars” were expelled from the core of 30 Doradus as the result of dynamical interactions. These interactions are very common during a process called core collapse, in which more-massive stars sink to the center of a cluster by dynamical interactions with lower-mass stars. When many massive stars have reached the core, the core becomes unstable and these massive stars start ejecting each other from the cluster.

The big cluster R136 in the center of the 30 Doradus region is too young to have already experienced a core collapse. However, since in smaller systems the core collapse is much faster, the large number of runaway stars that has been found in the 30 Doradus region can be better explained if a small cluster has merged into R136.

Follow-up studies will look at the area in more detail and on a larger scale to see if any more clusters might be interacting with the ones observed. In particular, the infrared sensitivity of NASA’s planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow astronomers to look deep into the regions of the Tarantula Nebula that are obscured in visible-light photographs. In these areas cooler and dimmer stars are hidden from view inside cocoons of dust. Webb will better reveal the underlying population of stars in the nebula.

quantumaniac:

How an Unknown Grad Student Saved Apollo 13 - and how NASA covered it up.

Either via movies, news reports or by word of mouth, you’ve likely heard of the ill-fated Apollo 13 space mission. Next to Apollo 11, it’s one of NASA’s proudest achievements — returning three men to Earth against insurmountable odds. That return was only possible thanks to the bright idea of a NASA scientist who claimed that slingshotting the craft around the moon was the only way back. Now, a former NASA staffer has revealed that it wasn’t NASA’s idea at all, and the internet is on a quest to find who it was.

The bold claim that NASA didn’t actually save Apollo 13 came from the space agency’s ex-deputy chief of media relations during the time of the Apollo 8 and Apollo 11. He’s 97 years old now and like the good sport he is, took part in a Reddit ask me anything with the aid of his grandson.

He was asked pretty early on in the caper about Apollo 13, and whether or not he thought the crew would make it back to Earth. He said he had no hope for the crew’s survival, but that didn’t stop him and everyone else at NASA from staying awake for 7 days straight to try to bring the astronauts home.

That was before he dropped this bombshell:

All the engineers and everybody else at NASA in Houston were working hard at recovering the moonshot, and they were in real trouble, weren’t sure they could get it back. They got a phone call from a grad student at MIT who said he knew how to get them back. They put engineers on it, tested it out, by God it worked. Slingshotting them around the moon. They successfully did. They wanted to present the grad student to the President and the public, but they found him and he was a real hippy type — long hair and facial hair. NASA was straight-laced, and this was different than they expected, so they withdrew the invitation to the student. I think that is a disgrace.

According to the grandson who was relaying the answers, the 97-year old had been keeping this secret his whole life based on how hard the story was to tell. NASA apparently made a concerted effort to bury the grad student’s involvement in the mission.

History recounts the decision to slingshot around the moon as one that was weighed against what’s known as a “direct abort”. That is, burning every last drop of fuel in the craft to put it into an about face and return it to Earth. Flight Director Gene Kranz reportedly made the decision to slingshot around the moon in a bid to get the astronauts home. No grad student has yet been mentioned in the pages of history.

Redditors called on the ex-NASA member to right the wrong by outing the name of the grad student, but got no response. As a result, the community is now on the hunt for the name of the student.

quantumaniac:

Chemistry On Mars

The Mars Science Laboratory will be seeking clues to the planetary puzzle about life on Mars, the Curiosity rover is one of the best-outfitted chemistry missions ever. Scientists say Curiosity is the next best thing to launching a team of trained chemists to Mars’ surface.

“The Mars Science Laboratory mission has the goal of understanding whether its landing site on Mars was ever a habitable environment, a place that could have supported microbial life,” says MSL Deputy Project Scientist, Ashwin Vasavada, who provides a look “under the hood” in this informative video from the American Chemical Society.

“Curiosity is really a geochemical experiment, and a whole laboratory of chemical equipment is on the rover,” says Vasavada. “It will drill into rocks, and analyze material from those rocks with sophisticated instruments.”

Curiosity will drive around the landing site at Gale Crater and sample the soil, layer by layer, to piece together the history of Mars, trying to determine if and when the planet went from a wetter, warmer world to its current cold and dry conditions.

The payload includes mast-mounted instruments to survey the surroundings and assess potential sampling targets from a distance, and there are also instruments on Curiosity’s robotic arm for close-up inspections. Laboratory instruments inside the rover will analyze samples from rocks, soils and the atmosphere.

The two instruments on the mast are a high-definition imaging system, and a laser-equipped, spectrum-reading camera called ChemCam that can hit a rock with a special laser beam, and using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, can observe the light emitted from the laser’s spark and analyze it with the spectrometer to understand the chemical composition of the soil and rock on Mars.

collegehumor:

Domino Chain Gets Bigger and Bigger

If you think that’s impressive, you shouldn’t see him on a date. 

He sounds so out of breath. Not sure if tired or just really really really really excited.

quantumaniac:

Bionic Penguins
In 2009, a German Engineering Firm, Festo, developed two colonies of bionic penguins that are able to demonstrate collective behavior. The penguins can utilize their flippers and swim smoothly through the water just like real ones, and larger models filled with helium are able to fly and “swim” through the sky. The penguins contain a 3D sonar system, which is used to monitor its surroundings and avoid collisions. 
Flexible glass fibre rods were used to control the heads, which enables graceful, smooth head turns. “The fibres are arranged around the side of each penguin’s head, while motors inside the body pull on one or more of them to twist the penguin’s neck in any direction and guide the swimmer, says Markus Fischer, who heads Festo’s corporate design team.”
The penguins are also able to collectively work together in a group, exhibiting what psychologists know as “crowd behavior,” in which one member can respond and react to what another does. 
You can watch the video here. 

quantumaniac:

Bionic Penguins

In 2009, a German Engineering Firm, Festo, developed two colonies of bionic penguins that are able to demonstrate collective behavior. The penguins can utilize their flippers and swim smoothly through the water just like real ones, and larger models filled with helium are able to fly and “swim” through the sky. The penguins contain a 3D sonar system, which is used to monitor its surroundings and avoid collisions. 

Flexible glass fibre rods were used to control the heads, which enables graceful, smooth head turns. “The fibres are arranged around the side of each penguin’s head, while motors inside the body pull on one or more of them to twist the penguin’s neck in any direction and guide the swimmer, says Markus Fischer, who heads Festo’s corporate design team.”

The penguins are also able to collectively work together in a group, exhibiting what psychologists know as “crowd behavior,” in which one member can respond and react to what another does. 

You can watch the video here

quantumaniac:

Major Telescopes and their Primary Parts


blue is where the science happens

quantumaniac:

Major Telescopes and their Primary Parts

blue is where the science happens

quantumaniac:

Muons
In continuation with these fun little posts about particles, we direct our sights to the muon! It derives its name from the Greek letter mu (μ), which is used to symbolically represent it. The muon is an elementary particle that is really, really similar to the electron - with an equal negative charge to the electron and a spin of ½. It is classified as a lepton, which is a group of particles that is home to the electron, the tau, and neutrinos. As is the case with leptons, the muon cannot be broken down any further - it is fundamental. 
As experiments have shown, the muon is unstable - possessing a mean lifetime of only about 2.2 µs (microseconds). All muons decay into three particles, an electron and two different types of neutrinos. The muon has a corresponding antiparticle as well - the antimuon (also known as the positive muon). Like all antiparticles, the antimuon the same mass and spin as its counterpart, but an opposite charge. 
Muons have a mass of 105.7 MeV/c2, which is approximately 200 times the mass of an electron. Since the interactions are very similar, a muon can basically be thought of as a much heavier sister of the electron. Due to their mass, muons do not accelerate as sharply in electromagnetic fields and do not emit as much deceleration radiation, which allows them to penetrate far more deeply into matter than electrons. 
P.S: Do you like the picture? Get awesome plush particles from the Particle Zoo! 

quantumaniac:

Muons

In continuation with these fun little posts about particles, we direct our sights to the muon! It derives its name from the Greek letter mu (μ), which is used to symbolically represent it. The muon is an elementary particle that is really, really similar to the electron - with an equal negative charge to the electron and a spin of ½. It is classified as a lepton, which is a group of particles that is home to the electron, the tau, and neutrinos. As is the case with leptons, the muon cannot be broken down any further - it is fundamental. 

As experiments have shown, the muon is unstable - possessing a mean lifetime of only about 2.2 µs (microseconds). All muons decay into three particles, an electron and two different types of neutrinos. The muon has a corresponding antiparticle as well - the antimuon (also known as the positive muon). Like all antiparticles, the antimuon the same mass and spin as its counterpart, but an opposite charge. 

Muons have a mass of 105.7 MeV/c2, which is approximately 200 times the mass of an electron. Since the interactions are very similar, a muon can basically be thought of as a much heavier sister of the electron. Due to their mass, muons do not accelerate as sharply in electromagnetic fields and do not emit as much deceleration radiation, which allows them to penetrate far more deeply into matter than electrons. 

P.S: Do you like the picture? Get awesome plush particles from the Particle Zoo

quantumaniac:

First Zero-G Wedding

Noah Fulmor and Erin Finnegan (above and below) became the first couple to get married in weightless conditions on June 20, 2009.

powderpastthegenitals:christinetheastrophysicist:

UCSD Physicist Uses Math to Beat Traffic Ticket

A physicist at the Univeristy of California San Diego used his knowledge of measuring bodies in motion to show in court why he couldn’t be guilty of a ticket for failing to halt at a stop sign. The argument, a four-page paper delving into the differences between angular and linear motion, got the physicist out of a $400 ticket. 

Read More.

Read his paper titled “The Proof of Innocence.”